If you need a more accessible version of this website, click this button on the right.Switch to Accessible Site

(202) 388-5303


Monday, 26 October 2020 00:00

A broken foot can occur as a simple crack or as a complete break in the bone. Signs of a fractured foot can include tenderness, increased pain when standing or walking, numbness, swelling, bruising, trouble with movement, and an abnormal foot shape. If you believe that you have fractured your foot, you will likely need to visit a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis. In order to properly diagnose a foot fracture, an X-ray, CT scan, MRI or a bone scan will be necessary. Once a foot fracture is diagnosed, a cast, splint, or boot may be needed to limit the foot’s movement. A podiatrist will likely prescribe medicine, and in some cases surgery may be necessary as well.

A broken foot requires immediate medical attention and treatment. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Lubrina Bryant from District Podiatry, PLLC. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Broken Foot Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

A broken foot is caused by one of the bones in the foot typically breaking when bended, crushed, or stretched beyond its natural capabilities. Usually the location of the fracture indicates how the break occurred, whether it was through an object, fall, or any other type of injury. 

Common Symptoms of Broken Feet:

  • Bruising
  • Pain
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Blue in color
  • Numbness
  • Cold
  • Misshapen
  • Cuts
  • Deformities

Those that suspect they have a broken foot shoot seek urgent medical attention where a medical professional could diagnose the severity.

Treatment for broken bones varies depending on the cause, severity and location. Some will require the use of splints, casts or crutches while others could even involve surgery to repair the broken bones. Personal care includes the use of ice and keeping the foot stabilized and elevated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Washington, D.C. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment for a Broken Foot
Thursday, 22 October 2020 00:00

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Monday, 19 October 2020 00:00

An ankle sprain, which occurs when there is a tear in the ligaments that connect the bones and stabilize the ankle, is one of the most common injuries in sports. Activities that require jumping, turning, or twisting, such as basketball, volleyball and football, increase the risk of an ankle sprain. Other risk factors include a previous ankle injury, lack of strength, stability, or flexibility in the ankle, sudden direction changes, and poor balance. Common signs of an ankle sprain include swelling, bruising, instability, and pain, particularly during weight bearing activities. Proper diagnosis of an ankle sprain requires the help of a podiatrist. X-rays will need to be taken in order to rule out a fracture, and the sprain will be assessed on a grading scale from 1-3. Upon diagnosis, rest, ice and elevation are usually suggested, and your podiatrist will provide stability options as well. If you believe that you have recently sprained your ankle, make sure to consult with a podiatrist today. 

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact Dr. Lubrina Bryant from District Podiatry, PLLC. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Washington, D.C. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ankle Sprains
Monday, 12 October 2020 00:00

The tibial nerve is located in a small tunnel surrounded by tendons in the inner side of the ankle. Tarsal tunnel syndrome can develop when this specific nerve becomes compressed, and is often accompanied by pain and swelling. It may happen as a result of enduring an ankle injury, such as a sprain or fracture, or from having bone spurs. Mild relief may be found when the affected foot is elevated, and it may help to take anti-inflammatory medication. In severe cases, surgery can be a viable option to permanently reduce or eliminate the pain that is associated with this condition. If you have developed this ailment, it is strongly recommended that you speak with a podiatrist who can help you choose the correct treatment option.

Tarsal tunnel syndrome can be very uncomfortable to live with. If you are experiencing tarsal tunnel syndrome, contact Dr. Lubrina Bryant of District Podiatry, PLLC. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

Tarsal tunnel syndrome, which can also be called tibial nerve dysfunction, is an uncommon condition of misfiring peripheral nerves in the foot. The tibial nerve is the peripheral nerve in the leg responsible for sensation and movement of the foot and calf muscles. In tarsal tunnel syndrome, the tibial nerve is damaged, causing problems with movement and feeling in the foot of the affected leg.

Common Cause of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Involves pressure or an injury, direct pressure on the tibial nerve for an extended period of time, sometimes caused by other body structures close by or near the knee.
  • Diseases that damage nerves, including diabetes, may cause tarsal tunnel syndrome.
  • At times, tarsal tunnel syndrome can appear without an obvious cause in some cases.

The Effects of Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome

  • Different sensations, an afflicted person may experience pain, tingling, burning or other unusual sensations in the foot of the affected leg.
  • The foot muscles, toes and ankle become weaker, and curling your toes or flexing your foot can become difficult.
  • If condition worsens, infections and ulcers may develop on the foot that is experiencing the syndrome.

A physical exam of the leg can help identify the presence of tarsal tunnel syndrome. Medical tests, such as a nerve biopsy, are also used to diagnose the condition. Patients may receive physical therapy and prescriptive medication. In extreme cases, some may require surgery.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Washington, D.C. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Tarsal Tunnel Syndrome
Connect with us