Monday, 13 August 2018 00:00

Varicose veins are a common problem for women across the world. The biggest risk factor for developing this condition is heredity. Surprisingly, over 80% of people who have varicose veins have them because of genetics. If you are looking for ways to reduce your risk of getting varicose veins, you should start by making lifestyle modifications. Maintaining an optimal weight, avoiding a sedentary lifestyle, and avoiding wearing tight clothes and heels are all ways you can reduce your risk of developing the disease. Although people consider this condition to be a cosmetic problem, it can also cause you to feel symptoms such as heaviness, pain, itching, swelling, burning, numbness, and cramps. If you have varicose veins in your lower extremities, such as the foot, you should consult with your podiatrist.

Vascular testing plays an important part in diagnosing disease like peripheral artery disease. If you have symptoms of peripheral artery disease, or diabetes, consult with Dr. Lubrina Bryant from District Podiatry, PLLC. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What is Vascular Testing?

Vascular testing checks for how well blood circulation is in the veins and arteries. This is most often done to determine and treat a patient for peripheral artery disease (PAD), stroke, and aneurysms. Podiatrists utilize vascular testing when a patient has symptoms of PAD or if they believe they might. If a patient has diabetes, a podiatrist may determine a vascular test to be prudent to check for poor blood circulation.

How is it Conducted?

Most forms of vascular testing are non-invasive. Podiatrists will first conduct a visual inspection for any wounds, discoloration, and any abnormal signs prior to a vascular test.

 The most common tests include:

  • Ankle-Brachial Index (ABI) examination
  • Doppler examination
  • Pedal pulses

These tests are safe, painless, and easy to do. Once finished, the podiatrist can then provide a diagnosis and the best course for treatment.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Washington, D.C. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 06 August 2018 00:00

There are several benefits to the overall health of the feet when the toes are properly stretched. Toes may deform gradually over time as a result of several factors. These may include wearing shoes that are too snug for extended periods of time, improper use of the foot muscles while walking, or standing with the feet pointing outward, which puts pressure on the big toe. When the toes are stretched, the possibility of developing Athlete's foot may diminish as a result of adequate space between the toes. There are simple and effective toe stretches that can be performed daily for optimum results. These may include bending your toes downward to stretch the top of the foot, and taking each toe in your hands while pulling it away from the toe next to it. If you would like additional information about the benefits of stretching your toes, please consult with a podiatrist.

Stretching the feet is a great way to prevent injuries. If you have any concerns with your feet consult with Dr. Lubrina Bryant from District Podiatry, PLLC. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

Stretching the Feet

Stretching the muscles in the foot is an important part in any physical activity. Feet that are tight can lead to less flexibility and make you more prone to injury. One of the most common forms of foot pain, plantar fasciitis, can be stretched out to help ease the pain. Stretching can not only ease pain from plantar fasciitis but also prevent it as well. However, it is important to see a podiatrist first if stretching is right for you. Podiatrists can also recommend other ways to stretch your feet. Once you know whether stretching is right for you, here are some excellent stretches you can do.

  • Using a foam roller or any cylindrical object (a water bottle or soda can will do), roll the object under your foot back and forth. You should also exert pressure on the object. Be sure to do this to both feet for a minute. Do this exercise three times each.
  • Similar to the previous one, take a ball, such as a tennis ball, and roll it under your foot while seated and exert pressure on it.
  • Grab a resistance band or towel and take a seat. If you are using a towel, fold it length wise. Next put either one between the ball of your foot and heel and pull with both hands on each side towards you. Hold this for 15 seconds and then switch feet. Do this three times for each foot.
  • Finally hold your big toe while crossing one leg over the other. Pull the toe towards you and hold for 15 seconds. Once again do this three times per foot.

It is best to go easy when first stretching your foot and work your way up. If your foot starts hurting, stop exercising and ice and rest the foot. It is advised to then see a podiatrist for help.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Washington, D.C. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about How to Stretch Your Feet
Monday, 30 July 2018 00:00

The most common cause of heel pain may be a condition that is referred to as plantar fasciitis. It occurs when the thick ligament that connects the heel to the front of the foot becomes inflamed. It’s purpose is to aid in walking, in addition to supporting the arch. Some of the symptoms that many patients experience is heel pain and moderate to severe stiffness, which may make walking up and down the steps difficult. This condition may affect people from all walks of life, and more specifically runners, women in late pregnancy, and those who are overweight. Additionally, this ailment may be caused by inherited traits, which may play a role in altering the structure of the foot. If you feel you may be afflicted with plantar fasciitis, it’s important that you contact a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can advise what the best possible treatment options are for you.

Plantar fasciitis is a common foot condition that is often caused by a strain injury. If you are experiencing heel pain or symptoms of plantar fasciitis, contact Dr. Lubrina Bryant from District Podiatry, PLLC. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What is Plantar Fasciitis?

Plantar fasciitis is one of the most common causes of heel pain. The plantar fascia is a ligament that connects your heel to the front of your foot. When this ligament becomes inflamed, plantar fasciitis is the result. If you have plantar fasciitis you will have a stabbing pain that usually occurs with your first steps in the morning. As the day progresses and you walk around more, this pain will start to disappear, but it will return after long periods of standing or sitting.

What Causes Plantar Fasciitis?

  • Excessive running
  • Having high arches in your feet
  • Other foot issues such as flat feet
  • Pregnancy (due to the sudden weight gain)
  • Being on your feet very often

There are some risk factors that may make you more likely to develop plantar fasciitis compared to others. The condition most commonly affects adults between the ages of 40 and 60. It also tends to affects people who are obese because the extra pounds result in extra stress being placed on the plantar fascia.

Prevention

  • Take good care of your feet – Wear shoes that have good arch support and heel cushioning.
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • If you are a runner, alternate running with other sports that won’t cause heel pain

There are a variety of treatment options available for plantar fasciitis along with the pain that accompanies it. Additionally, physical therapy is a very important component in the treatment process. It is important that you meet with your podiatrist to determine which treatment option is best for you.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Washington, D.C. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

 

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Monday, 23 July 2018 00:00

Many people are unaware that they may have toenail fungus, and this may often be a result of a lack of pain and discomfort. Common symptoms that are associated with this ailment may include the toenail becoming dry and brittle, the nail appearing yellow and thick, or a separation from the nail and the nail bed. It’s important to take proper care of your feet, which may possibly avoid this unsightly condition from developing. There are several ways to accomplish this, including wearing shoes that fit properly, trimming the toenails correctly, and wearing appropriate shoes in the shower and pool areas. If you are afflicted with toenail fungus, it’s suggested to speak with a podiatrist who can provide proper guidance for the best treatment options.

For more information about treatment, contact Dr. Lubrina Bryant of District Podiatry, PLLC. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Toenail Fungus Treatment

Toenail fungus is a condition that affects many people and can be especially hard to get rid of. Fortunately, there are several methods to go about treating and avoiding it.

Antifungals &  Deterrence

Oral antifungal medicine has been shown to be effective in many cases. It is important to consult with a podiatrist to determine the proper regiment for you, or potentially explore other options.

Talcum powder – applying powder on the feet and shoes helps keep the feet free of moisture and sweat.

Sandals or open toed shoes – Wearing these will allow air movement and help keep feet dry. They also expose your feet to light, which fungus cannot tolerate. Socks with moisture wicking material also help as well.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our office located in Washington, D.C. We offer the newest diagnostic tools and technology to treat your foot and ankle needs.

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